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20121101
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the nation as the jackpot hits $550 million. nbc's jay gray is in dallas where the tickets are being at a fast and furious pace. jay? >> reporter: yeah, we're at fuel city where they sell a ton of gas. they have great tacos here. they sell a lot of other things too. as you can see the big ticket item today obviously has been those tickets. first you have the group that came in before work this morning, then the lunchtime crowd came in, now we're getting a bit of lull before the end of work group makes their way through to buy tickets. and we expect this place to be jam packed like it has been throughout the day today. they are selling at a fast pace, not only here in dallas, but across the country, a lot of work going on, and right now the "associated press" just reporting the rate of sales is 130,000 tickets every minute right now. they've already sold more than $1 billion worth of tickets. you know, that $1 out of every $2 that is spent on a ticket goes to the state selling that ticket. a lot of states obviously use that to fund programs including education here in texas and some o
that and extend it out further. >> richard fisher of the dallas fed told me last night they don't do that. actually, that's not fair. he said in his opinion they shouldn't do that. we don't know, you might right. mike of "forbes," thank you very much. >>> this is truly the video of the day. the israelis get their man. the military head of hamas taken down with a missile strike and the fighting isn't over. what's it mean for our security and even our markets? all while we don't have a cia director. we're going to ask a mideast expert in our next half hour. >>> now, wait a minute, take a look at this rare diamond. 76 carats. almost lost this story. 76 carats sold at auction in geneva last night for $21.5 million. the arch duke joseph diamond. it's flawless, colorless diamond which brought bidders in, and it's got a history belonging to a dynasty. how about that? >>> up next, the former cia director, david petraeus, put state secrets in peril. the president said there's no evidence, but senior senators accuse obama of a possible benghazi cover-up. we'll get right to that also. >>> this presi
-old building in downtown dallas was imploded yesterday. no, it's not jerry jones' reaction to the cowboys' play against the browns yesterday. they did win. demolition experts attached 300 pounds of dynamite in strategic places and there it went. built in the 1920s, that building, by a cotton tycoon. >>> we talk a lot about how the fiscal cliff will hurt the u.s. but that obscures the pain that will be felt at the state and local levels. our senior economics reporter steve leisman has been doing the math about who falls the hardest if we do go over the cliff. steve? >> if you think about it, it is designed so that there is a lot of pain. the idea of the fiscal cliff, the sequestration, automatic cuts to bring people to the table. we've done, with the help of technology, using diver technology, we dove in to take a look at where federal spending is highest. it is color coated by per capita spending by county here. what you see -- take a look. where it's red it's the highest from 20 all the way up to 175,000. there's actually one county in north carolina where i think hatteras island is where ther
investors. pickens runs a hedge fund in dallas and is now a true believer. >> we're managing $5 billion here, and about 10% of it's in the oil sands. so it's the one single largest investment we have. >> 10% of $5 billion. i flunked math. >> 500 million. >> and if oil sands are the answer for investors, are oil sands the answer for the united states? >> oh, i think so. [ticking] >> but despite the boomtown mentality in the great white north, we'll meet environmentalists who say there may be a high price to pay to get all that oil out of the dirt when 60 minutes on cnbc returns. [ male announcer ] this december, remember -- you can stay in and share something... or you can get out there and actually share something. ♪ the lexus december to remember sales event is on. this is the pursuit of perfection. or that printing in color had to cost a fortune. nobody said an all-in-one had to be bulky. or that you had to print from your desk. at least, nobody said it to us. introducing the business smart inkjet all-in-one series from brother. easy to use. it's the ultimate combination of speed, small
of walmart for three years. where are you joining us from? >> i'm joining you from dallas, texas. >> are you working today? >> i was actually scheduled to work today, but i called off the job today. i'm officially on strike. >> why are you on strike? >> well, i'm on strike because of walmart's continuous retaliation against those of house choose to speak out against all of the injustices we have inside of our job and me and quite a few other associates have been taking actions last month building up to black friday. >> and why the move now? what is happening internalaly a far as you are concerned? >> we've done everything within our power to sit down and talk with corporate executives of walmart. we tried to talk to our managers and address these issues as far as treatment of associates who choose to speak out, the retaliation and they seem like they just don't want to listen to us and address these issues so we just feel like now is a time for all of us to stand up and to speak out and let everyone know that the things that go on inside of walmart are sometimes treacherous and we're struggl
is president of the dallas fed, an extinguished fellow for the policy analysis, also a cnbc contributor and robert is a cnbc could contributor as well. robert helde robert heller, what happens now? he's going to have big decisions to make when it comes time to reverse this policy if in fact you believe that is going to happen sometime soon. >> they will do everything possible to support his policies. they will continue to buy a humongous amount of debt and fi nan the deficit. >> bob, what about you? i guess it's hard to talk about a reversal of fed policy when you have a day like today and discussions like we're having regarding the fiscal cliff. is it somehow accelerated in the months to come given the risks in the near term. >> i think there's hope that it will come to an end at some point. i doubt that mr. bernanke is going to be around after the first january 2014. i can't imagine that he'd want a new term, although i agree with robert that that probably wouldn't change the course of monetary policy. i think at the very least we've got another year and a month of what we now have. >
spending cuts and revenue increases. in the meantime, dallas fed president richard fisher tells cnbc that the central bank can't do much more to shelter the economy. >> we need to completely reboot tax policy and spending policy. if we have temporary fixes to the fiscal cliff, just push out the envelope of indecision until we have a sense of true direction, and it's time for our politicians to get their act together. >> fisher says he does not view the fed as a safety net. that is certainly a change of perception, one that congress is going to have to figure out pretty quickly along with the rest of washington. >> that it is. there's been a number of interviews this morning that would lead you to the same place. cisco reporting better than expected first quarter earnings in revenues, but the tech giant expects flat earnings and slower revenue growth for the current quarter. john chambers sees europe getting worse before it gets better, but he says there are signs of improvement in the u.s. economy. >> we want to be the one company that both exceeds expectations and doesn't bring down
Search Results 0 to 7 of about 8 (some duplicates have been removed)